Fighting for you

If you have a claim against an employer or coworker, I will fight your case.

Straight talk

I will let you know if you have a claim or not after your free consultation.

No upfront fees

I work entirely on a contingency basis. If we don’t win, you don’t pay.

Workplace Harassment

Being harassed at work? You can do something about it.

If you are an employee in Florida, you have a right to put an end to workplace harassment. 

Laws have been specifically designed to protect anyone who is on the receiving end of physical or verbal harassment because of sex, race, color, age, disability, religion, and more.

As an experienced workplace harassment lawyer based in South Florida, I can help you:

  • Understand your rights according to state and federal laws
  • Assess whether you have a legitimate workplace harassment complaint 
  • Pursue legal action if you have been harassed 

Free Consultation

  • Do you have an employment claim? Find out with a free consultation with an employment attorney.

What is the difference between harassment and discrimination?

Discrimination and harassment in the workplace are both unlawful.

  • Discrimination is being treated differently to others on the basis of other prohibited categories such as national origin, race/color, gender, religion, etc.
  • Harassment is being mistreated by another person based on prohibited categories such as national origin, race/color, gender, religion, etc.

In simple terms, discrimination often feels unfair whereas harassment may feel intimidating or abusive. Discrimination and harassment violate both federal and Florida state employment laws. 

In some cases, what starts as discrimination may evolve into harassment.

What does the law say about workplace harassment?

According to Florida law, harassment is unwelcome conduct that is based upon any of the following categories:

  • Race
  • Color
  • Religion
  • Gender
  • Pregnancy
  • National origin
  • Age
  • Disability 
  • Genetic information

There are several pieces of legislation that govern workplace harassment, including:

  • Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964
  • The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA)
  • The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)

Workplace harassment becomes unlawful where:

  1. Enduring the offensive conduct becomes a condition of continued employment, or 
  2. The conduct is severe or pervasive enough to create a work environment that a reasonable person would consider intimidating, hostile, or abusive

You are entitled not only to put an end to the harassment in question. 

You are also protected from retaliation for reporting the harassment or for filing a claim, testifying, or participating in an investigation, proceeding, or lawsuit under these laws.

What constitutes workplace harassment?

If you are looked over for a promotion that you think you deserve based on the results you have achieved, and you suspect it is because of your gender, you may have a case for workplace discrimination. However, if you are on the receiving end of lewd, offensive or derogatory remarks from your boss, you may have a case for workplace harassment.

This applies equally to ethnic slurs or racist jokes: this is workplace harassment based on national origin or race.

It should not be tolerated any more than physical threats should be.

Some other specific examples of offensive conduct that constitute workplace harassment include:

  • Offensive jokes
  • Epithets or name calling
  • Physical assaults or threats
  • Intimidation
  • Ridicule or mockery
  • Insults or put-downs
  • Offensive objects or pictures
  • Interference with work performance

Harassment can occur from many workplace entities, including:

  • The victim’s supervisor or a supervisor in another area
  • An agent of the employer
  • A coworker 
  • A non-employee of the organization

Also, note that the victim does not have to be the person harassed but can be anyone affected by the offensive conduct. 

Furthermore, it does not have to involve economic injury to the victim.

Sexual harassment in the workplace

One of the most common types of workplace harassment is sexual harassment.

Some examples include:

  • A supervisor or manager making inappropriate comments of a sexual nature to an employee
  • An employer offering promotion or benefits in return for sexual favors
  • A coworker displaying sexually explicit pictures
  • Inappropriate touching or unwanted advances from a coworker or supervisor

Note that sexual harassment in the workplace, like all forms of harassment and discrimination, can originate from male or female employers or coworkers, or even non-employees of the company.

Sexual harassment can also be perpetrated by a person of the same gender.

Non-sexual harassment

As well as sexual harassment, you are protected against harassment in the workplace based on:

  • Race or color
  • Age
  • Religion
  • National origin 
  • Disability
  • Pregnancy

This includes slurs, “jokes,” offensive or derogatory comments based on any of the above-forbidden categories.

Some workplaces may violate the laws in multiple categories. They become hostile environments for employees with a culture of discrimination and harassment.

Others may just experience isolated cases of harassment.

Either way, it does not have to be tolerated.

Have you been a victim of harassment?

Harassment in the workplace is a serious employment problem.

It can have grave effects on a person’s wellbeing and can damage their:

  • Performance at work
  • Career prospects
  • Financial situation
  • Physical and mental health 

Sometimes, people do not report cases of harassment out of fear of losing their jobs.

However, state and federal laws protect you not only from the harassment itself but also from retaliation by an employer if you do make a complaint or claim.

The right legal advice at the start can empower you and provide peace of mind to put a stop to the harassment.

Harassed at work? What do you do?

If you have been harassed at work, you may be able to take legal action that requires your employer to:

  • Take action to restore you to the same position you would have been in if the discrimination had not taken place
  • Pay damages to compensate you for back pay, benefits, emotional distress, suffering, and so on
  • Prevent future acts of harassment in the workplace

As an experienced employment harassment attorney, I can help assess your case.

If pursuing legal action is the right option, I will also help you take the necessary steps to build your case.

Next steps

From here, we need to:

  1. Assess your claim. Start by booking a free phone consultation below.
  2. Decide whether to pursue a complaint after our consultation.
  3. File a complaint or lawsuit with a local or federal agency, or state or federal court.
  4. Prepare the paperwork so that we can draft the complaint or lawsuit.

Call For A Free Consultation

973-584-1400

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Impressed, does his homework, objective and passionate. This guy does not sugar coat the facts he will tell you straight up what’s going on and in today’s world that’s important. If you have a legal issue this guy will stand by you and fight for you. Very impressed.

Eddie B. (Florida)

Ryan represented us in a high-profile religious discrimination lawsuit. His work product and professionalism are exceptional.

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